This clearly isn’t going to be the greatest blog post ever. In fact, its probably far from it but I’m allowed to make such claims because it’s only mere puffery. Those unfamiliar with the term should check out the Facebook group The Carbolic Smoke Ball Cured My Cold.


So when Skins claimed that they “don’t pay elite athletes to wear” their sports gear, they were using the same thing. Apparently the ACCC isn’t aware that consumers aren’t idiots.

Contrary to popular belief, people don’t believe everything we tell them.

The story of Corey Worthington and his infamous party made front page on the newspaper. Soon after this media interview became viral, quickly reaching the top ten over at Video Viral Chart.

Merely hours after this story exploded on the interweb, slapcorey.com was launched. What better way could Vivo Group market themselves than through what they claim to do best?

At more than 500,000 hits, I’d say this is a great example of UNM2PNM.

When we use the Interweb, we surf naked. Nothing is left unseen and we lose our privacy in its entirety. There is an SMS service in Australia called Bongo (199BONGO) which can answer any question or tell you about any person, so it claims.

Bongo’s website says to have a massive data base, and after doing a check on me, I was somewhat surprised with the responding SMS…

“Bongo knows that Zac has a very dirty sense of humour, he has never been much of a morning person and he will be coming into money this year.”
People who know me fairly well would say this is quite surprisingly true. This ex employee claims that is it simply done with a Google search. A quick search through social networking, work, school, university and clubs etc. could reveal such information.

My Facebook page would reveal the first two points in the message, that is if they weren’t generic. And as to coming into money this year, the Monash University Scholarship page reveals that I’m expecting a payment in a few months.

The key note here is not that your information is available but rather how quickly it can be accessed.

In case you missed it, the title of this post is sarcastic. In fact, I speak it fluently. Anyway, as I sat down to watch my newly purchased DVD, Knocked Up, it got me thinking.

At the start of every movie is an anti piracy clip lasting about thirty seconds. You can see the Australian version here

 

 

Now as I sit down to enjoy this movie, which I’ve purchased with my hard earned money, I’m confronted with this. You see the same thing at the cinemas, shortly after purchasing your ticket.

The geniuses behind this campaign (notice the sarcasm again) are targeting the wrong people.

Why would you punish law abiding citizens, more importantly, your loyal customers?

Mozilla Firefox have launched their latest campaign; Fight Against Boredom via this video

 

 

Last time, I commented on what a great campaign Mozilla ran but this time I feel differently. The video here is lacking. It looks cheaply done, isn’t funny, controversial or even interesting. With the exception of Chocolate Rain weblebrity, Tay Zonday, the clip doesn’t have anything that gives me the urge to spread this so called viral.

I expected so much more… but that quick brown fox may yet jump the lazy dog. If you go to the website, you need a username and password to get in. Is this a mistake on the website design or something incredibly brilliant to get blogger’s like myself talking? It certainly would help fight the boredom trying to crack the puzzle.

Failed campaign or mystery in the works?

Edit: Turns out it was somewhat of a failed campaign. The website was launched prematurely and the video was not approved by Mozilla. The website has since had restricted access placed over it, but perhaps they could still turn this into something?

Like every marketing blog, article or podcast you’ve read or listened to lately, its time to reflect upon 2007. I have no awards to give out or predictions to make, but merely wanted to discuss the brilliant marketing of perhaps my favourite food chain; Nando’s.

There’s so much going for these guys its hard to know where to start but what stands out most is their advertising. Whether its their commercials, print media or campaigns; they’re all brilliant. Their website has just a few examples used in Australia.

Their Nando’s Fix Gum campaign was genius. Great word of mouth qualities and even more so when they gave away free gum at their stores. Check out the spot here

 

 

According to The Australian, this was the most complained about advert of 2007.

A similar campaign was run last year with Nando’s Fix Patches. Whether its in the newspaper or on display in their restaurants, their print ads are also always witty or funny, most importantly highly talkaboutable. Recently FHM ran a free poster giveaway through Nando’s which I wrote in for. I received a letter in the mail saying “We know its not as good as the chick on page 29, but we thought you may like a meal on us!” with a free meal voucher attached. The note was hand written.

I’m looking forward to Nando’s’ marketing campaigns throughout 2008.

Also, if you’re interested in other trends and news from 2007, Julian Cole linked me to Most Contagious 2007. Its also worth checking out the 2006 edition.

Whether you agree with Seth Godin‘s views or not, there is no doubt about the fact that he can write. This probably explains his rank as the best marketing blog on the net.

I’ve being following it for a few months now, and recently purchased his book Free Prize Inside. I feel very out of league commenting, but I have on order Purple Cow and Meatball Sundae.

If there’s one thing you can learn from him, its the way he writes. Any new blogger, marketing or not, should follow his work just to gain as basic understanding of the best practice when it comes to blogging. Whether this is to keep it simple, short and to the point or the importance of regular but relevant content.

It’s certainly going to change the way I blog.