gavin heaton

This week, is Man Week. And I've been tagged by Gavin Heaton to write about it. However, like Stan Lee, I tend not to write about much personal stuff here unless I can tie it into marketing or blogging. Which is convenient, because my post is about this blog. I'm still a teenager. And as my amazingly dirty attempt at a beard would suggest I'm not even sure if I can use the word "man". In fact on some levels I'm fairly immature and don't even act my age at the most inappropriate of times. But the biggest change in my personally, as far as I can tell, is I'm no longer as quiet as I once was. My childhood was normal. I don't have an amazing story to tell. My parents separated before I could say the word marriage but I can't complain about how I was raised. I was labelled a geek at school who sat at the top of every class academic wise, but not harshly done and it was even something I called myself. While the rest of the kids were busy talking in class, I was busy working. And I think that made me quiet. I'd still talk and socialise of course, but no one would ever mistake me for "the loud one" in the class room. But around Year 10, I decided to start being louder. Not neccessarily talking more, just putting myself out there, taking opportunities that came up and generally expressing myself when I wanted to. I'm not sure why, but I do remember it being a conscious decision. And it was fun. And it taught me my opinions and thoughts are valid. And to not work too hard. I think over the past five years it's continued to build, especially when I look at how much I've changed since, even still if you compared to my first week at Uni to now. And one of the ways I've been able to do this, is with a blog. I've always said starting this blog was one of the best things I ever did, and not just career wise. This is one of those "not just career wise" things. It's given me a platform to express myself and express my passion. It's let me be as loud as I want. It's gotten me thinking, writing and doing something I love. And it's been an important aspect in shaping me into the man I am today....

I've been meaning to post about Twitter for a while. It is fundamentally flawed. Both the concept and the design. It is ridiculously hard to read or thread conversations, if you watch more than 50 people it is easy to miss something and the layout is simply atrocious. Yet it continues to gain popularity. I thought newcomer Plurk (much less fundamentally flawed) would overthrow it, but even I turned back to Twitter eventually. I think Twitter some how manages to be successful because it's addictive. Once you've started it's hard to give it up. Although most start by asking, "Isn't it just like updating your Facebook status?", it grows on you. Stan Lee signed up just two weeks ago and I think he's now in need of a patch to control the cravings. His page used to display a badge that said he wasn't on the Twitter bandwagon, but that's changed just a little hasn't it, Stan? It's hard to explain but I think Gavin Heaton summed it up best when he said, "You get out what you put in"....