October 2009

Perhaps my single most favourite use of Twitter is asking for help, as selfish as that sounds. Last night, just hours before an assignment was due I needed a quote from an old edition of AdNews. I put out a call to my tweeps and Trevor Young saved my ass.The fact that I can ask for a information, feedback or even an idea and receive multiple replies within minutes still amazes me. And this goes both ways, breaking down nearly all barriers between people. To me, this defines a community.Imagine if a brand helped you, and likewise could ask for help and receive it....

"Semi permanent" Julian Cole's blog is about to turn three. And to celebrate, he's just posted about how his blog has changed over time to become more relevant to real world. Unfortunately, not all of us have real world experience. In fact, this blog is based entirely off my own observations and insights. And with my own blog about to turn two on Saturday, I've been thinking a bit about my approach to blogging; that is to start fires and play the joker. I came to a conclusion that is perhaps better explained with a diagram...

First we had iSnack 2.0. And thanks to a tip off from Marek, now we have LOL Juice. Please, marketers with grey hair and sagging man boobs, stop trying to talk to younger generations using their language. Tools like this one should be used to translate one way, not communicate. There's only a few brands in product categories that could actually pull it off. Spreads and fruit juices are not one of them. The marketers using 1337 speak today are probably the same ones who used words like "rad", "sick" and "hip" nine years ago. It didn't work then and I won't work now. Please stop trying. That is all. Editor's Note: I use the word rad and I'm bringing it back. ...

I'm often told I push the whole new media thing too hard and too much. In a realistic world blah blah blah. So instead today I'd like to offer something you might expect to hear from someone older. Just because you were mentioned on a blog doesn't mean anything. Even if it's in a positive light. I bring this up because I've read many articles and case studies lately that include lines like "the blogosphere went crazy" or "tonnes of bloggers picked up on the campaign". Realistically, unless you get picked up by one of only a few key players, it doesn't mean shit. And just because your Google Alerts lead you to a blog with five readers doesn't mean you can claim it as a big PR win. Even if someone like myself mentions you, it's probably not a big deal. With around 500 subscribers, maybe 200 will read this post. Include a few hundred randoms and you're still not having a massive impact. I'm sure there's a whole 'nother post here as to whether or not someone like myself is worth responding to (hint: the answer is it depends). But what ever you do, don't go making bullshit claims about causing a stir in the blogosphere because some 20 year old mentioned you on his crappy blog. ;]...

I'm sure you're all over Vegemite talk by now. Buzz has spread itself across all media (see what I did there?) and you've probably never had more conversations about the black paste in your life.But I suppose that's the thing. Whether you think it was a good idea or a bad one, or a deliberate one or accidental, never in my life have I spoken about Vegemite so often. And never in my life have I been as passionate about original Vegemite.I have no plans try the new one, I won't even consider buying it and I'm totes over the whole "name our product" marketing campaign everyone seems jumping on the bandwagon with.But fuck it made me realise how much I love original Vegemite....

I almost feel as though I have neglected this bad boy a bit over the past few weeks. The good news is it's because I've been working flat out with an agency on a pitch. My very first pitch, which I gave to the client this morning. An important part of any young marketer's career I'm told. Anyway, unfortunately I can't give any deets for a while. However I can say my week involved circus training, free breakfasts, lunches and dinners, a hotel spa, a photo shoot and a rocking crew of people to work with. Probably a lifestyle I could get used to...

This is Prezi. It, or something like it, will hopefully make PowerPoint presentations obsolete.After playing around with it a little, I'd say it takes a bit to get proficient with the way it works and for your basic presentations I'd probably stick with what you know. But for those of you who love telling stories and laying out your presentations visually, this tool is totally rad to the power of sick....