October 2008

Sometimes it's the small things that make a real difference. And I'm not even talking about the remarkable stuff. That small something could be enough to motivate you, or de motivate you if it doesn't exist (see Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory). Can you imagine Google if you had to click on the text box every time you went to the homepage? Or the frustration someone has when they're shopping online, the page times out and they have to start again? Or even getting my morning coffee and not seeing a smile from the girl behind the counter? If you're not going to be remarkable, at least get the small stuff right. What small thing makes a difference to you? Good or bad, online or offline....

Gen Y just doesn't care about their privacy. Speaking as one of them, I am not worried about the information that goes up on my social networking profiles. I share personal information every day and tagged in photos every Monday morning after a big weekend. And there are some shocking ones. The reason I bring this up is because Gen X's are constantly telling me that this is going to affect my career with employers frowning upon such behaviour. But I disagree. Sooner or later employers are going to release that the high majority of Gen Y have at least one Facebook photo that shows them partying, drinking or worse. Interestingly, I don't have a problem with complete transparency or the need to hide what I do in my own time. What's going to be really interesting is when Gen Y takes a majority in the workplace and they (we) become the employers of the next generation, what ever they're called. Can you even imagine what the social norms will be then? I actually have a link to my Facebook page in my email signature. And I send emails to potential future employers every day. I'm not worried about the photos they will see. Although sooner or later someone might realise I only have one suit and two shirts that I have to keep alternating....

Chris Anderson is pretty much a genius. His work on The Long Tail is pretty much amazing and his latest ideas about Free have really taken my interest. A couple of weeks ago I posted some of my concepts for new media business models. A couple of days later David Armano posted this diagram which lead me to Chris's work. In a moment of the light bulb going off in my head I realised my models almost perfectly fit the first three of his Models of Free. Read both my post and his for a deeper understand but basically...

We have a problem. Its realisation comes after Telstra Bigpond raised a legal issue over their Twitter account. They had worries about breaching the 2003 Spam Act. Currently, their legal department is trying to determine if their communications could be considered a commerical electronic message, in which case would be against the law. The Australian Government Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy has this to say about the issue...